CT as Accurate as Invasive Tests for Heart Blockages

by User Not Found | Dec 01, 2013
In an international study of 381 patients with no history of coronary artery disease, CT accurately ruled out block-ages in 91% that would have required invasive procedures. The study participants had two types of CT scans.

In an international study of 381 patients with no history of coronary artery disease, CT accurately ruled out block-ages in 91% that would have required invasive procedures. The study participants had two types of CT scans. The first was a CT angiography to assess whether or not there were blockages and if so, where. The second was a CT perfusion study where medication was given to dilate the blood vessels and increase blood flow to the heart, similar to a stress test. According to researchers, the combined radiation exposure from both the CTA and CTP is still less than that of the widely used 64-detector CT scanner.

Senior author of the study, Joao A. C. Lima, MD, professor of medicine and radiology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine said, “The study findings would apply to people who have chest pain but not a heart attack based on EKG and other evidence. Many people in that situation are sent to a cardiac catheterization laboratory for further evaluation with angiography, an invasive test to look for blockages in the coronary arteries using dye and special X-rays. About 30% of people who have such catheterizations are found to have minimal disease or no blockage requiring an intervention to open the vessel with a stent or bypass the vessel through surgery.”

 
 
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